SHOP AND/OR READ HERE:

for actors

books by/for/about actors

adoption resources

books about adoption

apparel

eyewear
headgear
menswear
shoes
swimwear
ties
women's sleepwear & lingerie
womenswear

arts, visual

art supplies
books about art
pressed flowers
works of art

auctions/classified
advertisements

auctions
classified advertisements

automotive

insurance
parts
rental
repair
vehicles for sale

awards we bestow

blog: random ramblings

books

books by/for/about actors
books about adoption
books about art
books about chocolate
books about dreams
books about the holocaust
books about travel

business services

education, training &
employment

employment/business & freelance
opportunities

essays by lady g

financial services

banks
credit
insurance
investment
loans

flowers & greetings

flowers
greeting cards
pressed flowers
telegrams

food and drink

alcohol
candy
chocolate
coffee/tea/tisane
gourmet
groceries
ice cream
onions & garlic

free offers, contests &
sweepstakes

contests
free offers
sweepstakes

genealogy

gifts

cookie jars
judaica
music boxes
teapots
whoviana

health & beauty products &
services

cosmetics
eyewear
insurance
medical services
perfume
skin care
spa/gym services
vitamins & other supplements

home and garden

home decor
gardening
homes for rent or sale

jewelry & watches

jewelry
watches

for kids

babysitters
infant resources
keeping kids amused

legal services

magazines & newspapers

subscriptions
to read online

music/other audio

cds & other music media
music boxes
musical events
musical instruments
musical instruction

nonprofits GENESSA favors

office supplies/computer hardware/home electronics

home electronics
computer hardware
office supplies & equipment

paranormal

astrology
books about dreams
dreams
other paranormal
tarot

pets/wildlife

rewards/incentive programs

search engines

social

advice
dating & social clubs
events & tickets
holidays
parties & party supplies
virtual communities
weddings

computer software

sports/outdoors

telephony & online providers

cellular phone service & supplies
internet service providers
landline phone service & supplies
VOIP

toys/games

arcade games
adventure & rpg
board games
card games
computer, video & game system games
dolls & stuffed animals
general games
online games
toys

travel services and supplies

accommodations
auto rental
insurance
luggage

video/dvd

for webmasters

affiliate services
clip art/graphics
web hosting/domain services

about webring

for writers

resources
supplies

writings by lady g











GENESSA -- ONIONS!!



Lady G Expounds Upon Onions





Don't hate me; I got my little sister stoned. She wasn't that little, and she didn't actually get stoned. I was home from college and some friends and I offered her a joint. Nothing happened. She felt obligated, though, to act stoned (she later admitted) so she blurted out "I feel like an onion." Those of us who were actually stoned may or may not have found that "deep."

Maybe she'd been listening to the Beatles' "Glass Onion" from their White Album, which had come out a few years earlier, on the sixth anniversary of JFK's death. We still listened to that. I still do.

I didn't find out until less than three years before her death that my mother didn't like to eat onions. (She had never, to my recollection, served them to us; I had never thought about it.) She liked their flavor; she would cook with them, then discard them. What a waste, I thought. During that educational visit I made her hand them over to me instead, and I gobbled them greedily. You could not have gotten me to exchange them for chocolates. (Well, not milk chocolates, anyway.)

Many film buffs discovered the (huge) talents of actor James Woods by virtue of his performance in The Onion Field. Not I; I discovered the film (and the Joseph Wambaugh book from which the film had been adapted, by virtue of having seen Woods in Holocaust, also where I first saw Meryl Streep, come to think of it.

When Holocaust was first aired, I was pretty excited. At the time, I worked for the Social Security Administration (an organization that now declines to give me the time of day) in downtown Los Angeles, in a room where eight of us occupied desks in two rows facing each other from opposing walls. I came to work in high spirits the day after the first episode, asking everyone if they'd seen the show. No one had. And furthermore, added one colleague, she never would. She didn't approve of such shows. They caused ill feeling among people of different races or beliefs. She hadn't watched Roots (nor, I presume, read the Alex Haley book Roots: The Saga of an American Family upon which the miniseries was based) when it was aired the previous year, and she wasn't going to watch this either. "Why," she proposed, "what if after watching it, as a result, a little Nazi child went to school and got picked on by a little Jewish child?"

Yes, I was flabbergasted, too.

Anyway, my recollection of how things were during Roots' airing was that it promoted communication and caused not one whit of bad feeling among races or religions. That year I was working for the Accounting Section of the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., among people of various nationalities, ethnicities, so-called races, religions, ages, regional backgrounds and sartorial inclinations (I mention that last while fondly remembering an extremely meticulously dressed colleague who, not least because of a coincidental physical resemblance, always reminded me of Ron Glass's character, Harris, in the then-current sitcom Barney Miller, of which I was fond; he even carried himself like Harris, and just the sight of him always made me smile). Apart from the usual office politics, of which I was too ignorant to be a part, relations ranged from polite to friendly, but no one spoke about race. It was considered rude to notice that someone's skin was a shade or two paler or darker than one's own. During and after Roots, people would say, in effect, "hey, I can't help noticing you're black. My great-grandfather was a slaveowner. Sorry about that!" and get, in response, "Cool, my folks were sharecroppers. Let's do lunch!" (Okay, they didn't say "do" lunch; this was before I moved to California.) So I thought Holocaust would open things up between my people, Jews, and non-Jews (I wasn't thinking about little Nazi children).

I might add that I was a fairly naive brat at the time, and even before Roots would open my mouth in ways others were not wont to do. During my early days with DOJ, before my employers calmed down (from what? you ask! Don't ask!) enough to assign me enough work to keep me busy all day, I sat reading an excerpt, in The New Yorker, from James Baldwin's upcoming book, The Devil Finds Work: Essays, which was of particular interest to me not only because I was a fan of Baldwin's already but because since the age of 15 my concerns had included the issue of stereotyping. I had begun to notice that teenagers, on television, were rarely portrayed by real teenagers, and that even when they were, they didn't act like anyone my age, not anyone I'd ever met. Then I started noticing that there were virtually no Jews on television. Oh, there were plenty of Jewish comedians, actors, writers, directors, producers... just no Jewish characters, with the notable exception of comics and Holocaust victims. There were no ordinary Jewish people.

(Valerie Harper's Rhoda in The Mary Tyler Moore Show was as close as one could find to an ordinary, everyday Jew, but of course she was funny. At least -- and this was unusual -- she wasn't funny because she was Jewish. She happened to be Jewish and also happened to be funny. Later, Judd Hirsch would portray a Jewish lawyer, the leading character, in a mini-miniseries called "The Law," but when it was picked up as a regular series, Delvecchio, he mysteriously became Italian. It wasn't until 1982's mid-season replacement -- for what I have no clue -- Hill Street Blues that American TV saw not one, yet, but two actual Jews who were neither comics -- though Bruce Weitz's Belker was often funny; Joe Spano's Goldblume was a regular guy -- nor Holocaust Victims.)

So I was extremely interested in Baldwin's memories of growing up black and gay in a world in which gays were not portrayed directly at all and blacks were maids or slaves, depending on whether the setting was modern or historical. I couldn't wait for the book to come out. My friend Betty -- whom I hadn't known long, but already liked, and who happened to be black -- walked into the office while I was reading, and I looked up and asked her how she felt when she saw black people portrayed in the movies. Did she, I wanted to know, think, "oh look, one of us/me" or "crap, that's not real, why don't they get it right," or nothing special at all?

To this very day I cannot recall Betty's answer because what I do recall is her shocked expression when I asked my (did I mention naive?) question.

I did not bring up Holocaust again during its week-long run. I didn't want to envision any more little Nazi children.

I'm sorry, were we talking about onions?

Did you know that garlic is almost an onion? They're both allium, anyway. A garden, or bulb, onion is allium cepa and garlic is the intriguingly named allium sativum, the plural of which, of course, would be allium sativa (I refer you back to the first paragraph of this essay, which refers obliquely to cannabis sativa). I don't believe my mother ever introduced me to garlic. I may well have decided to include it in my pantry because of Werner Herzog. Always a fan of his, I was interested in Les Blank's documentary, Burden of Dreams, about the making of Herzog's Fitzcarraldo. As a result I became interested in Blank himself and immensely enjoyed his Garlic Is As Good As Ten Mothers. Perhaps that was my introduction to garlic; at any rate, we got introduced, and we've never been apart since, thus proving that I am not a vampire. I have a theory, and I will write it up one day (look here for a link when I do) that the pre-Stoker Dracula myth has two sources: the real-life exploits of a couple of weird Romanians, and longstanding Eastern European anti-Semitism. (The Plague did its bit to enhance the already existing legends.)

I have a friend named Boe, an American like myself, whom I met when he was in my employ at a language school whose Nagoya, Japan, branch I was managing at the time. He returned to the United States for a bit but returned to Japan and stayed with me for a few months while seeking a place of his own. (I told him he had to be out by summer; there was no way I was going to keep my clothes on in the house during a Japanese summer!) During his brief stint as my (just friends, folks!) roommate, I taught him how to cook. One day, while I was at work and he was not, I phoned him to ask him to start some spaghetti. I instructed him to chop up a clove of garlic. When I got home, he was exhausted and apologetic; he had tried to get a whole clove chopped but couldn't quite do it. He hoped that what he had accomplished would suffice. He had understood "clove" to mean "head" and had peeled and chopped up almost a whole noggin. The dish now featured quite a few cloves of garlic. The spaghetti did not suffer from his error and I learned a lesson too: there is no such thing as "too much garlic."

Toward the end of my stay in Japan, after the language school had closed its branch and I was able to take on more university positions, I moved (alone) to a house in another part of Nagoya and found I was able to walk to and from one of the universities, a very good one, Nagoya University, crossing my narrow street and walking a short distance down a narrower one until I came to a steep hill, up the side of which I'd puff until I reached the graveyard at the top, through which I'd then circle the whole hilltop in order to reach the path down another side, which spilled out into another short bit of narrow road that led, finally, to one of the widest, most major streets in all of Nagoya. Several blocks down this street was the University. I'd be fairly chugging along by the time I reached it and ready to walk miles more, which of course provided some of the energy I needed to teach my classes. At the end of the work day, I would reverse the procedure, with two minor changes. For one thing, I would be pretty hungry by then, so I'd stop at a family restaurant about halfway back to the hill. This eatery was large, with a fair-sized room in the front, an expansive one in the back and a salad bar between them. The salad was cheap and included among its delicacies sliced raw white onions that were mild and sweet. I couldn't figure out why they were so mild; finally I broke down and asked. The answer: they were soaked in water (for an unspecified period of time), then drained. They retained their crunch but lost their sting. I asked one other thing, too: since there was some separation of areas already, why not turn the front room, where I habitually sat, into a nonsmoking area? This was virtually unheard-of in Japan; in Japan, at the time, the percentage of the (presumably adult) female population who smoked cigarettes had recently risen from a number I have forgotten to something over 20; the number of men who smoked had recently dropped to about 60 percent. The restaurant's management didn't roll over the minute I made my request but I made it repeatedly and they finally caved: the front room became an official nonsmoking haven. So they took the sting out of breathing as well! The other difference between my pre- and post-work walks was that by the time I finished my sting-free dinner, night would have fallen, and I would trudge down the lamplit street to the dark hill, up the path and through the graveyard. One night I noticed the Buddhas atop the gravestones staring at me, and hastened through. The next time I was there, university-bound, in daylight, I could not help noticing that, of course, there were no Buddhas atop the gravestones. There never had been.

A couple years ago (we're skipping way ahead now, decades and eons) I planted some onion bulbs. I think I got my guy to plant some of them for me, actually. Most of them just sat there: what do you expect us to do? Grow? One or two turned into fine sweet yellow onions; I ate the green shoots of the stubborn ones. They're supposed to be perennial but nobody told them, so they never came back. We buy them, these days, and go through them pretty fast, too: between five and ten a week, depending on my energies and the size of the onions, and whether I have made chopped liver. This is how I make chopped liver: I wash and drain, in a colander, a pound of chicken livers, and throw them into the blender. I peel and section (not formally; I am just trying to get it into manageable chunks) a sweet yellow onion and dump it in with the livers. I core and likewise slice an apple and add it in too. I shake in some lemon pepper and some garlic salt, and add a few peeled cloves (not heads) of garlic for good measure. I add just enough water to prevent the machine from choking, and hit the high-speed button. The cats go flying out of the room, and the blender fills with red-brown goo, which I pour into a hot, oily skillet, cover and let bubble for a few minutes before reducing the heat to somewhere between simmer and low. I walk away. I come back once in a while to check it. When it looks like chopped liver I take it off the heat and spoon it into a bowl. I add creamy poppyseed dressing or mayonnaise, depending on my mood, and refrigerate it until I can't wait any longer. I eat it by the spoonful or smear it on crackers or toast. Yes, I share it with my guy. No, I don't share it with the cats. Garlic is fabulous for cats but onions are highly toxic. I shall illustrate:

Back in Japan, my strong-willed and strong-bodied cat, Wafer, was in the habit of opening the refrigerator and taking out whatever he fancied; I ended up having to bungee-cord the fridge door shut, in response to which he just hopped up on top of the freezer and opened that. (He would take out the frozen corn, begin to nibble it, jerk his head back and try to shake off the sensation of cold, then try another bite.) Before I resorted to the bungee cord, though, he habitually took out whole heads of raw broccoli and devoured them. (As a result of his special diet, necessitated by his almost literally recalcitrant urinary tract, he suffered from heartburn and craved alkaline foods; broccoli hit the spot.) However, once he decided he preferred my spaghetti leftovers. He hadn't eaten much before I discovered his mischieve and retrieved (and binned) the mess, but even the tiniest bit had enough onion in it to send his entire system into a tailspin. He almost died. He survived thanks to a caring vet, who had saved his life more than once already, and his own strong will.

I am less strong than I once was, and I have, on occasion, asked my guy to help me out in the kitchen. The phrase "help me out in the kitchen" generally means "get out of the kitchen, but in these rare instances I have asked him to be there (and allow me to be absent) and prepare food. Preparing food is not one of his talents, nor one of his interests. In fact, he hates it and he's awful at it. However, he grudgingly, even whiningly, complies upon those few occasions.

The first time I asked him to slice onions, he took three hours to slice one. Of course that time included the peeling, which he began after he was done slicing. He also cried through the whole procedure. He had forgotten my advice: run cold water while you're dealing with onions and you won't shed a single tear.

Why slice onions? Why not chop them, or just hack 'em up? I don't know. Somehow they taste better sliced into rings, separated and spread out in a bowl, sprayed with cooking oil and microwaved for five minutes. Of course saut?ng them in a pan works too, but if you walk away and get distracted, they can burn. The microwave knows when to stop.

You should stop me when I ramble on like this. You really should. I write this stuff at weird hours, hours at which no one should be wanting onion rings or Japanese pickled garlic. But you see, I believe I've got the No Sleep Blues, courtesy the Incredible String Band's The 5000 Spirits or the Layers of the Onion.

Onion Ring Batter Mix 6/9oz  Onion Ring Batter Mix: GR

Onion Ring Batter Mix 6/9oz Onion Ring Batter Mix: GR

Onion Batter Mix


Nemco 55700 Blooming Onion Cutter For Colossal Size Onions, 24-Section

Nemco 55700 Blooming Onion Cutter For Colossal Size Onions, 24-Section

Easy Flowering onion cutter; sturdy, all metal construction for long life


RSVP International Onion Goggles, Pink

RSVP International Onion Goggles, Pink

Finally, a tear-free solution for chopping onions! These goggles have fog-free clear lenses and a foam seal that protects the eyes from irritating onion vapors. Pink frames in unisex design. Fits most face shapes.


Onion Powder Cert. Organic 3.74 oz Bottle: K

Onion Powder Cert. Organic 3.74 oz Bottle: K

Organic Onion Powder


Spice Supreme 394477 Spice Supreme  Toasted Minced Onion Case of 48

Spice Supreme 394477 Spice Supreme Toasted Minced Onion Case of 48

2 5/8 oz. Plastic Bottle. Adds great flavor to any dish. Packed: 48 per case. Satisfaction ensured. Manufactured to the highest quality available.


Morton & Bassett MORTON PREM SLCD ONION, 3 Units 1.3 oz

Morton & Bassett MORTON PREM SLCD ONION, 3 Units 1.3 oz

Morton & Bassett MORTON PREM SLCD ONION, 3 Units 1.3 oz


Sour Cream & Onion Ripple Chips - 6/16Oz S Cream &Onion Ripple: GR

Sour Cream & Onion Ripple Chips - 6/16Oz S Cream &Onion Ripple: GR

Sour Cream & Onion Ripple Chips


Sesame Sticks Honey Mustard & Onion - 2/7.5 Lb Honey Mustard/Onion Sx: GR

Sesame Sticks Honey Mustard & Onion - 2/7.5 Lb Honey Mustard/Onion Sx: GR

Sesame Sticks Honey Mustard & Onion


Sesame Sticks Poppy & Onion - 2/7.5 Lb Sesame Stx Poppy&Onion: GR

Sesame Sticks Poppy & Onion - 2/7.5 Lb Sesame Stx Poppy&Onion: GR

Sesame Sticks Poppy & Onion


Presto 05420 FryDaddy Electric Deep Fryer 1200W, 4 Cups, Non Stick,  Handy Scoop for fries, chicken, onion rings and more

Presto 05420 FryDaddy Electric Deep Fryer 1200W, 4 Cups, Non Stick, Handy Scoop for fries, chicken, onion rings and more

These Presto(r) deep fryers are terrific for making delicious fries, chicken, onion rings and more.rn. The proper frying temperature is automatically maintained.rn. Handy scoop stirs, separates, lifts, drains, and serves.rn. Nonstick surface, inside and out, for easy cleaning.rn. Snap-on lid lets you store oil to use again and again.rn. 4-cup oil capacityrn. 120 volts AC, 1200 watts.


Onion Rings - 12/4 1/8Oz. Onion Rings: GR

Onion Rings - 12/4 1/8Oz. Onion Rings: GR

Onion Rings


J&A Sweet Onion Relish - 12/16Oz J&A Sweet Onion Relish: GR

J&A Sweet Onion Relish - 12/16Oz J&A Sweet Onion Relish: GR

J&A Sweet Onion Relish


Le Creuset Le Creuset French Onion Soup Bowl Caribbean Blue #PG1175-1617 - Serving Bowls

Le Creuset Le Creuset French Onion Soup Bowl Caribbean Blue #PG1175-1617 - Serving Bowls

Le Creuset Le Creuset French Onion Soup Bowl Caribbean Blue #PG1175-1617 The Le Creuset Stoneware French Onion Soup Bowl is a beautiful way to serve the classic soup of caramelized onions swimming in a rich broth topped with a hearty slice of French bread and dripping with bubbling cheese. Le Creuset stoneware offers the ultimate in versatility and is fabulously durable. It can bake in an oven up to 500 degrees F, go in the microwave or under the broiler. It can also go from the freezer into a cold oven so stoneware, food, and oven heat up together. The enameled surface also makes them incredibly resistant to scratches, chipping, and staining. - Non-porous material resists stains, cracks and chips and does not absorb odors and flavors - Freezer, microwave and dishwasher safe - Colors match the rest of your Le Creuset cookware collection - 16 Ounce Capacity; 8 x5 x 2.5 inch The ultimate in versatility, Le Creuset's line of traditional stoneware is recognized by chefs worldwide for excellence in functionality and durability, timeless design and inventive use of color. Le Creuset stoneware is attractive enough to go from the microwave or oven to the table for serving, and durable enough to transfer directly into the dishwasher or into the freezer or refrigerator for storing leftovers. The non-porous surface resists staining, chipping and scratching and will not absorb odors or flavors. Le Creuset stoneware is offered in vibrant color choices to suit any culinary preference and to coordinate with Le Creuset cast iron cookware. The Le Creuset Stoneware French Onion Soup Bowl is a beautiful way to serve the classic soup of caramelized onions swimming in a rich broth topped with a hearty slice of French bread and dripping with bubbling cheese. Le Creuset stoneware offers the ultimate in versatility and is fabulously durable. It can bake in an oven up to 500 degrees F, go in the microwave or under the broiler. It can also go from the freezer into a cold oven so stoneware, food, and oven heat up together. The enameled surface also makes them incredibly resistant to scratches, chipping, and staining. - Serving Bowls


Wolfgang Puck 21345 Organic French Onion Soup

Wolfgang Puck 21345 Organic French Onion Soup

WOLFGANG PUCK 12x 14.5 OZ ORGANIC FRENCH ONION SOUP. Organic vegetable stock together with organic onions butter spices and a touch of wine produce this delicious soup.:. (Note: This product description is informational only. Always check the actual product label in your possession for the most accurate ingredient information before use. For any health or dietary related matter always consult your doctor before use.)


French Onion Soup Mix - 15 Lb H.S. French Onion Soup: GR

French Onion Soup Mix - 15 Lb H.S. French Onion Soup: GR

French Onion Soup Mix


Gourmet Sour Cream & Onion Potatoes - 15 Lb Grmet Sr Crm&Onion Potato: GR

Gourmet Sour Cream & Onion Potatoes - 15 Lb Grmet Sr Crm&Onion Potato: GR

Gourmet Sour Cream & Onion Potatoes


Lipton Recipe Secrets Recipe Soup & Dip Mix 2 Envelopes

Lipton Recipe Secrets Recipe Soup & Dip Mix 2 Envelopes

2 envelopes in box, each 1.0 oz Also great for slow cookers Mix has many uses Made in Canada


Mrs. Grass Recipe Soup and Dip Mix - Onion - 4 Boxes (2 oz ea)

Mrs. Grass Recipe Soup and Dip Mix - Onion - 4 Boxes (2 oz ea)

1 Box = 2 oz (56.7 g); Recipe - Soup and Dip Mix - Onion. 6 Great recipes: French onion soup (on pouch inside box); best burger; slow cooker short ribs; crunchy baked chicken; easy meatloaf; and onion dip.


Paula Deen Set of 2 Creamy Vidalia Onion Dressing

Paula Deen Set of 2 Creamy Vidalia Onion Dressing

I just love Vidalia onions! This dressing has a sweet flavor to it that only a Vidalia onion can give. I prefer this dressing on an old fashion garden salad. Includes two 12-oz. bottles


Bertolli Sauce - Vidalia Onion with Roasted Garlic - 1 Jar (24 oz)

Bertolli Sauce - Vidalia Onion with Roasted Garlic - 1 Jar (24 oz)

1 Jar = 24 oz (680 g); Sauce - Vidalia Onion with Roasted Garlic. Made with 100% Bertolli Olive Oil. All natural. 2006 Best Taste Award: Chef's Best American Culinary.


Misc Imports Self Cleaning Aluminum Garlic Press. Each

Misc Imports Self Cleaning Aluminum Garlic Press. Each

Manufacturer: Misc Imports. Each. Self cleaning model has a plate of poly teeth that can be pushed through the holes in the base unit. Made of heavy die-cast aluminum. Customers also search for: Discount Self Cleaning Aluminum Garlic Press, Buy Self Clean


Garlic Plus Kyolic Formula 106 300 Caps

Garlic Plus Kyolic Formula 106 300 Caps

Garlic Plus Kyolic Formula 106Aged Garlic Extract [300 mg]; Natural Vitamin E (100 I.U); Hawthorn Berry [50 mg]; Cayenne Pepper [10 mg] (per capsule).Aged Garlic Extract has been shown to support healthy circulation and blood pressure.Vitamin E may support heart function by protecting the body against damage from free radicals and oxidants.Hawthorn berry and its antioxidative bioflavonoids help to maintain a healthy cardiovascular system.Hawthorn combined with garlic has been suggested to maintain a healthy heart, liver and pancreas..


Garlic, Garlic, Garlic

Garlic, Garlic, Garlic

Garlic, Garlic, Garlic


Figi's Kave Kure Cheese Logs - (8) - Food

Figi's Kave Kure Cheese Logs - (8) - Food

Cheddar & PecanPort Wine & PecanSmoky & WalnutSwiss & AlmondFrench Onion & PecanCool Ranch & PecanVeggie & PecanNacho Jalapeo & Pecan Flavored to perfectionNet weight: 6 oz. per log. Crafted from rich, creamy aged Wisconsin Cheddars rolled in chopped nuts and flavored to perfection. 4-Log Assortment includes: Cheddar & Pecan, Port Wine & Pecan, Smoky & Walnut, and Swiss & Almond. 8-Log Assortment includes: the same flavors as the 4-Log plus French Onion & Pecan, Cool Ranch & Pecan, Garden Veggie & Pecan, and Nacho Jalapeo & Pecan. Net weight: 6 oz. per log. Cheddar amp; PecanPort Wine amp; PecanSmoky amp; WalnutSwiss amp; AlmondFrench Onion amp; PecanCool Ranch amp; PecanVeggie amp; PecanNacho Jalapeo amp; Pecan Flavored to perfectionNet weight: 6 oz. per log. Crafted from rich, creamy aged Wisconsi


'Garlic and Old Lace' Giclee Frame Matted Print

'Garlic and Old Lace' Giclee Frame Matted Print



  • Artist: Zhee singer studio
  • Title: Garlic and old lace
  • Product type: Giccle print art
  • Style: Contemporary
  • Format: Horizontal
  • Size: Extra large
  • Subject: Cuisine
  • Image dimensions: 26 inches wide x 32 inches high
  • Product Dimensions: 44 inches wide x 36 inches high x 4 inches deep


Garlic and Roses (Large Print,Hardcover)

Garlic and Roses (Large Print,Hardcover)

A modern Californian makes a good living off the land, but work has kept her love life in a drought. Will she be open when God drops love right in front of her? Julie Maretti`s family is rich in garlic, but garlic has literally kept love at bay. Meeting Alan Louden where they both volunteer at a soup kitchen seems like a dream come true. But will love be smothered in odorous secrets? Love and faith are alive in Monterey. Can this modern businesswoman open up to their influence?


igourmet 2-lb. Garlic Cheese Assortment in Gift Box

igourmet 2-lb. Garlic Cheese Assortment in Gift Box

Garlic Cheese Assortment in Gift Box


Garlic Isle Macadamia Nut Oil Infused with Roasted Garlic by Oils of Aloha - 12.7 oz.

Garlic Isle Macadamia Nut Oil Infused with Roasted Garlic by Oils of Aloha - 12.7 oz.

Roasted garlic blended with macadamia nut oil imparts excitement to marinades and sautťed dishes. Excellent for cooking shrimp or chicken. Drizzle a little over your cooked pasta dishes for a pleasant flavor and aroma.Roasted garlic combined with Hawaii's original macadamia nut oil creates a flavorful oil for your favorite pasta, fish and chicken dishes. An excellent marinade for barbecued foods. The healthiest choice at 80% monounsaturated. Ingredients: 100% pure oil from Hawaiian macadamia nuts with added Vitamin E as an antioxidant. Cold pressed. Garlic Isle Macadamia Nut Oil Infused with Roasted Garlic by Oils of Aloha - 12.7 oz.


Shallots Onion Sets

Shallots Onion Sets

Flavor reputed to be far superior to that of scallions for delicate sauces and cream soups.


Sprouting Seeds, Onion

Sprouting Seeds, Onion

Onion seeds are ready iin 2-6 days and provide a hint of onion flavor to salads. For use in the Two-Tier Seed Sprouter System, #8111


Rosemary, Garlic & Green Onion Pistachio-Almond Medley, 3.5oz, Gone Nutz!

Rosemary, Garlic & Green Onion Pistachio-Almond Medley, 3.5oz, Gone Nutz!

A delicious blend of soaked Almonds and Pistachios for true garlic lovers.


Byler's Relish House Homemade Amish Country Hot Pickled Garlic 16 oz.

Byler's Relish House Homemade Amish Country Hot Pickled Garlic 16 oz.

Hot Pickled Garlic Item #DMG BYLERS 170 Closely guarded old family recipe Open kettle processing (made in small batches) for superior flavor Homemade in Saegertown, Pa in the heart of Amish country Reg. PA Department of Agriculture and FDA inspected This delicious flavorful garlic with spices is great eaten by itself or accompanying another dish Ingredients: garlic, water, vinegar, sugar, salt, spices Volume: 1 PT. (16 Fl Oz.) (473ml) Fat free, 25 calories per serving Dave‚??s Specialty Foods is a division of Dave‚??s Christmas Wonderland & Olde World Market, a WNY tradition and world famous Christmas Store, based in Cheektowaga, NY and serving Buffalo and the WNY area for over 33 years. We are proud to share Buffalo‚??s rich ethnic heritage and traditions with our specialty food products.


The International Garlic Cookbook by  Edition ILL, 2

The International Garlic Cookbook by Edition ILL, 2

Few foods inspire as passionate a response as garlic. The very word conjures up images of rich and delectable dishes - Italian pasta, Chinese stir-fries, Mediterranean sauces, French everything. Few foods are reputed to, possess such powers - from warding off vampires and the common cold to preventing heart disease. Scientists study it, chefs experiment with it, and the rest of us revel in it.The International Garlic Cookbook brings together nearly 50 recipes from around the world, selected from the popular Best Of cookbook series. All show off the stinking rose in its wonderful variety - whole or chopped, quickly saut6ed or slowly roasted, robust or gentle. Garlic fanciers can indulge their fantasies with Roasted Garlic from the Mediterranean, all-American Garlic Mashed Potatoes, North Beach Cioppino from California, France's classic Chicken with 40 Cloves of Garlic, and Italy's popular Fettuccine al Pesto. Here, too ,are Garlic Soup from Spain, Stir-Fried Spinach with Fragrant Garlic from China, and Steamed Mussels Layered with Thai Herbs from Thailand. Beautiful color photographs throughout bring this extraordinary culinary collection to life.


For the Love of Garlic: The Complete Guide to Garlic Cuisine

For the Love of Garlic: The Complete Guide to Garlic Cuisine

If you have a passion for the robust flavor and pungent aroma of garlic, here is a book guaranteed to both delight and satisfy. For the Love of Garlic is a celebration of an astonishingly versatile food. It explores garlic's past and present, and provides a wide variety of delicious kitchen-tested garlic recipes designed to entice not only garlic aficionados, but all lovers of great cuisine. Part One of For the Love of Garlic looks at the history, lore, and many uses of this culinary treasure, including its power to maintain radiant health. Part Two indulges in the tastes and pleasures of garlic by offering over eighty tempting dishes, from soups to nuts, that will allow you to satisfy all your garlic fantasies. Whether given as a gift or used as a personal reference, this beautifully designed and illustrated work will prove itself to be a useful and informative guide time and time again.


French Red Onion Seed Packet

French Red Onion Seed Packet

French Red Onion Seed Packet Giclee Print by . Product size approximately 18 x 24 inches. Available at Art.com. Embrace your Space - your source for high quality fine art posters and prints.


Woman in Polish Costume Inspects a Seed Patch in an Onion Field

Woman in Polish Costume Inspects a Seed Patch in an Onion Field

Joseph Baylor Roberts Woman in Polish Costume Inspects a Seed Patch in an Onion Field - Photographic Print











Contact GENESSA:

General email:
genessa@unforgettable.com

email Gail M. Feldman, Managing Partner:
genessa@unforgettable.com

email Richard L Cohen, Partner:
rlc48@comcast.net

Custom Search

SHOP HERE WITH
OUR SPONSORS!

Powered by WebRing.