Castleton Bridge Map 1950
Castleton Bridge 1950
Castleton Cutoff Selkirk Yard 1950
Selkirk Yard 1950
Welcome to our

"Castleton Cutoff and Hudson River Connecting Railroad"

WebSite

Here's a preview of some of the exciting projects we have put together for you:

Our feature article is about the Castleton Cutoff

We have other interesting articles about the Hudson River Connecting Railroad , the White Elephant Line , and Railway Express Agency .

We have maps of the Castleton Bridge area and Selkirk Yard . You can fly around the Albany area on Google Earth.

Starting with our Selkirk Photo Gallery , we have lots of interesting pictures. There is a collection of New York Central Railroad pictures , tunnels and bridges on the New York Central , the Hudson Line south of Beacon and a link to Albany County Historical Pictures .

There is a special section on The Hudson River , another on the Port of Albany , one on the Capital District .

, and a story on Transportation in Albany .

Other sections you shouldn't miss are rumors about Selkirk , railroads East of the Hudson key to Castleton Cutoff , some questions answered , and our reference section .

See KC Jones BLOG about Railroad History

Take a quiz on Which One of These People Hurt New York City the Worst?



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Castleton Cutoff

In the 1920's, one of the biggest projects of the NY Central of this era was the Castleton Cutoff which would replace the grades and drawbridge at Albany with a high-level river crossing several miles south of Albany. The Castleton Cutoff was not only a bridge (later named the A.H. Smith Memorial Bridge) but included the new yard at Selkirk which eventually replaced West Albany in importance. In 1924, A.H. Smith, the president of the New York Central, predicted a greater Albany. He expected Albany to grow to the Castleton Bridge. The bridge cost $25,000,000 and is 135 feet above the river. It consists of a 600 foot span and a 400 foot span. The bridge contains 23,000 tons of steel and 52,000 yards of concrete. The bridge, and 28 miles of track owned by affiliate Hudson River Connecting Railroad, connected the Boston & Albany, Hudson Division and West Shore (River Division) with the Mohawk Division. The new yard at Selkirk had 250 miles of track connected by 430 switches and served by 2 roundhouses. The opening ceremonies were attended by a large crowd including the Van Sweringen brothers who owned the Nickel Plate, W.H. Truesdale of the Lackawanna. William K. and Harold Vanderbilt, Mayor Hackett of Albany and New York Lt. Governor Lunn. Two bridges then served Albany. One bridge to the passenger station (now a bank computer center) lasted until the late 1960's. The northern of the two bridges is the present Conrail bridge used mostly by Amtrak. At that time it was considered the "freight" bridge but also was used by those few passenger trains that didn't stop at Albany (some sections of the 20th Century Limited and a couple of limiteds to the midwest).

Conrail's Boston-Buffalo freights cross the Hudson River on a long high bridge at Castleton on Hudson. It is east and slightly south of Selkirk Yard. It is next to the New York State Thruway bridge across the Hudson River. There is a track connecting Conrail's Selkirk-Boston line across the bridge with Conrail's line along the east shore of the Hudson River. For a number of years, the Boston section (448/449) of the Lake Shore Limited made a time consuming backup move over this connecting track on her journey between Rensselaer NY and Pittsfield MA; this move was eventually eliminated when the direct connecting track between Rensselaer and the CR Boston Line (previously eliminated by PC during the Roger Lewis era at Amtrak) was replaced.

Commodore Vanderbilt had actually envisioned a route similar to the present-day Selkirk-Castleton route that would have used the then-abandoned Saratoga & Hudson RR (the so-called "White Elephant" route that was built by the old New York Central to Athens on the Hudson River to connect with river steamboats there instead of at Albany) and bridged across the Hudson connecting with his New York & Harlem RR somewhere near Philmont, NY. In later years, of course, the "White Elephant" was used by the New York, West Shore & Buffalo which was built in direct competition to the New York Central's main line from New York to Buffalo. The West Shore also built a branch north from the Ravenna/Coeymans area to meet the Delaware & Hudson's line heading into Albany from the south. Now I understand that CP wants to abandon this former D&H line between Albany and its junction with the main line in Delanson.

By Ken Kinlock at kenkinlock@gmail.com

Find out about truth and Fairpromise

Hudson River Connecting Railroad

Hudson River Connecting Railroad
Organized 1913 by the New York Central
Constructed 1924

Included the following trackage:
· From the junction of what is now the Boston Line/Post Road Branch (Boston Line, CP-187), which was then the B&A Mainline, west across the Castleton (Alfred H. Smith) Bridge to what is now the western-most end of Selkirk Yard (Selkirk Branch, CP-Unionville), which was then the western junction with the West Shore;
· From the junction at the eastern end of the Castleton (Alfred H. Smith) Bridge (Boston Line/Selkirk Branch, CP-SM) south to Stuyvesant (Hudson Line, CP-124/CP-125), which is now the eastern-most (southern-most) extension of the Selkirk Branch;
· From the junction of what is now the Selkirk Branch (CP-SK) south to Ravena Yard (West Shore MP 132), which was then the southern junction with the West Shore.


There were originally two tracks diverging at Stuyvesant to go up the Castleton cutoff. The (presumably) up-bound track diverged right at Stuyvesant station, and the (presumably) down-bound track diverged a mile, perhaps more, farther north (compass north, railroad west!!) on the river side, and crossed the Hudson main on a flyover. In recent years the longer track was taken up, and what remains today is only the shorter one with the flyover. It was determined that the several raisings of the track over the years had exceeded the support limits for the light cinder material which made up much of the fill. In other words, the base was too narrow to support what was on it. The alternatives were: (A) dump x-amount of new fill to provide the needed additional support; (B) drive steel piling on both sides for the length of the fill; or (C) to permanently remove the track from service most cost-effective).

Commodore Vanderbilt had actually envisioned a route similar to the present-day Selkirk-Castleton route that would have used the then-abandoned Saratoga & Hudson RR (the so-called "White Elephant" route that was built by the old New York Central to Athens on the Hudson River to connect with river steamboats there instead of at Albany) and bridged across the Hudson connecting with his New York & Harlem RR somewhere near Philmont, NY. In later years, of course, the "White Elephant" was used by the New York, West Shore & Buffalo which was built in direct competition to the New York Central's main line from New York to Buffalo.

In the 1920's, one of the biggest projects of the NY Central of this era was the Castleton Cutoff which would replace the grades and drawbridge at Albany with a high-level river crossing several miles south of Albany. The Castleton Cutoff was not only a bridge (later named the A.H. Smith Memorial Bridge) but included the new yard at Selkirk which eventually replaced West Albany in importance. In 1924, A.H. Smith, the president of the New York Central, predicted a greater Albany. He expected Albany to grow to the Castleton Bridge. The bridge cost $25,000,000 and is 135 feet above the river. It consists of a 600 foot span and a 400 foot span. The bridge contains 23,000 tons of steel and 52,000 yards of concrete. The bridge, and 28 miles of track owned by affiliate Hudson River Connecting Railroad, connected the Boston & Albany, Hudson Division and West Shore (River Division) with the Mohawk Division. The new yard at Selkirk had 250 miles of track connected by 430 switches and served by 2 roundhouses. The opening ceremonies were attended by a large crowd including the Van Sweringen brothers who owned the Nickel Plate, W.H. Truesdale of the Lackawanna. William K. and Harold Vanderbilt, Mayor Hackett of Albany and New York Lt. Governor Lunn. Two bridges then served Albany. One bridge to the passenger station (now a bank computer center) lasted until the late 1960's. The northern of the two bridges is the present Conrail bridge used mostly by Amtrak. At that time it was considered the "freight" bridge but also was used by those few passenger trains that didn't stop at Albany (some sections of the 20th Century Limited and a couple of limiteds to the midwest).

By Ken Kinlock at kenkinlock@gmail.com

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Fly Around the Capital District!



If you have "GOOGLE EARTH" installed on your computer, you can "fly" along the railroads in the Albany Capital District with the "PLACEMARK" below: (Click to get GOOGLE EARTH)
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Selkirk Photo Gallery

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Railfanning Selkirk Yard



Mosher Bridge at the east end of the yard (route 396), Jericho Bridge over the fuel plant area just west of the hump and finally the Feura Bush Bridge over the very west end of the yard (route 32). There is also an overhead bridge over the tracks east of the east end close to CP-SK (US-9W) which will give you an overlook of the junction between the River Line, B. & A. and the Port Secondary.

Strongly suggest you stay out of the yard and off railroad property, there are CSX police officers on duty here 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Some good places west would be Game Farm crossing or further west county road 308 crossing which is known as New Scotland South Road. Probably the best spot of all is at Voorheesville which has two crossings, the west one of the two has a good spot to park very close to CP-VO which is where the diamond crossing with the D & H used to be. The earlier in the AM that you get there the better as there is a parade of westbound vans for the Mohawk leaving.
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The modern-day Selkirk Yard is excellently explained in this WebSite.
Steve's Railroad Pages, for railfans and other persons interested in rail transportation in the Capital District of New York State: facts, resource links, railfanning the Capital District, CSX's Selkirk Yard, and more!

White Elephant Line



The Athens Line was the Saratoga & Hudson River Railway, which was driven into bankruptcy and absorbed for next to nothing by New York Central & Hudson River Railroad. Central called it their Athens Branch, and used it very little.

The line went from Schenectady south through Fullers, Guilderland, Voorheesville, New Scotland, Unionville, Feura Bush, South Bethlehem, Coeymans, Coxsackie, and on to Athens where it met the Hudson.

It was generally known as the "White Elephant Line" -- because it was mostly useless.

Most of the ROW was leased by Vanderbilt's NYC&HRR to NYWS&B when they built up through that area. Of course, in due time, it came back to the Central as part of the West Shore Railroad.

The portion of the then NYC Athens Branch from Carmen to Fullers was indeed abandoned in the 1920s. The ROW was still visable from both ends when I was working around that area in the early 1980s.

The section between Fullers and Coxsackie is occupied and heavily used, for the most part, by the former West Shore Railroad (now CSX). New York Central leased the Athens line to the New York, West Shore & Buffalo when that company was putting together their route about 1880. The portion of S&HRR from Coxsackie to the river at Athens is also abandoned, as is the part between Feura Bush (Selkirk Yard) and Coeymans. The route the S&HRR took through Coeymans (now Ravena) was somewhat west of the current alignment of the CSX River Sub -- closer to the current alignment of US 9W. The original S&HRR route through Coeymans is pretty much obliterated by development. There are gas lines and power lines on parts of it south of Ravena.
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REFERENCE

List of New York Railroads
New York Central Railroad
List of New York Central Railroad precursors
CSX Albany Division
Post cards from Albany and around NY State
Broken Knuckle Video Productions

Railroads East of the Hudson key to Castleton Cutoff

As well as the obvious Boston & Albany Railroad, Hudson and Harlem Divisions, there were several railroads that played an historial role as building blocks for these divisions:

ALBANY AND WEST STOCKBRIDGE RAILROAD

This was formerly known as the Castleton and West Stockbridge Railroad. The Company was organized April 9, 1830, but nothing was done under the first name. The name of Albany and West Stockbridge Railroad was assumed May 5, 1836. The road was opened from Greenbush to Chatham, December 21, 1841, and to the State Line, September 12, 1842. It was leased to the Western (Mass.) Railroad, Nov. 18, 1841, for the term of its charter, and later was operated as a part of that road, including the ferry at Albany. The city of Albany at different times issued bonds for $1,000,000 to aid in building the road, the lessees paying the interest and $10,000 annually toward the sinking fund. It connected at Albany with Springfield and Boston.

THE ALBANY AND WEST-STOCKBRIDGE RAILROAD COMPANY:

see Boston and Albany Railroad Company.
Albany & West Stockbridge Railroad (Post Road Branch)
Chartered May 5, 1836 Completed East Albany to Massachusetts State Line (38.0 mi.) 1842 Consolidated into Boston & Albany Railroad 1871

HUDSON AND BOSTON RAILROAD CORPORATION

On April 26, 1832, the State of New York chartered The Hudson and Berkshire Railroad Company and made certain advances to aid the construction of its line, which was completed from Hudson to Chatham Four Corners and was opened for use in September, 1838. Owing to a default in the repayment of its advances, the State of New York sold the line November 21, 1854, and it was purchased in the interests of the Western Railroad Corporation and was then reorganized as the Hudson and Boston Railroad Corporation.
Mayor Corning of Albany  locomotive 999. It is 1954 and Mayor Corning of Albany is shown inspecting historic locomotive 999.
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Some Questions Answered About Selkirk and Castleton Cutoff

Why was the Castleton Cutoff built?. Back in the early 1900s, the Central found that traffic was growing beyond the capacity of West Albany Yard (which was geographically constrained from expanding), and that West Albany Hill had a tremendous detrimental effect on freight movements. With trains growing in length and weight, many needed helpers or even doubling to get up the grade.

The West Shore gave an alternative: Its route from Rotterdam Junction to Feura Bush had very minimal grades, and there was a lot of land available in Feura Bush for a new yard to relieve the congestion ongoing at West Albany. A line was surveyed across the river up to Post Road and the Alfred H. Smith Bridge was built, and a connector was constructed down to the Water Level Route. The line split a few miles north of Stuyvesant, with one track spanning the mainline to connect on the west side, allowing movements from NYC to access the Castleton Cutoff without fouling all the other mainline tracks while crossing over.

The original West Shore mainline remained in place after the first Selkirk Yard was constructed; the new yard leads split off around where CP-Unionville is located today. The old main ran along the base of the Helderberg Escarpment and curved to the south towards Ravena, where it connected with the line that led to the Port of Albany somewhere around Ravena High School. The Port line was upgraded to become the mainline to Selkirk, and a diamond (with wyes in all four quadrants) was constructed at the village of Selkirk: today's CP-SK.

The Alfred Perlman Selkirk Yard we know today was built in the 1960s to replace the original facility, which had essentially separate yards for eastbound and westbound cars. New technology was extensively used, and for a time Selkirk was the most advanced class yard of its kind in the world.

What is the Fullers Flyover? When the original dual-hump Selkirk Yard was constructed, it was arranged opposite of the current-of-traffic for freight trains on the Water Level Route west of Hoffmans. Instead of causing delays by having trains use a traditional crossover to flop tracks, what is now Main 2 was constructed to allow trains to "switch sides" without conflicting other traffic. Interestingly, there used to be a second main track alongside Main 1 from Voorheesville to somewhere around the county line, which explains a) the wide track centers west of CP-VO and b) the apparently-overly-wide bridge abutments over Frenchs Hollow and Route 20.

DeWitt versus Selkirk Yards

Selkirk Yard was opened in 1924, as part of the Castleton Cutoff, a low grade bypass around Albany, avoiding both the low level freight swing bridge and the steep westbound grade up to West Albany. It was a hump yard, but, until the very late New York Central period, only the eastbound hump was retarder equipped. The principal NYC yard on Lines East (of Buffalo) was DeWitt at Syracuse, and this yard classified, for practical purposes, just about every train east or westbound; it handled about four or five times as many cars as did Selkirk. Selkirk originated and terminated trains for the Boston and Albany and for the River Division (West Shore), as well as locals for the Albany and Hudson/River Division points. It also served as a "trimmer" yard for DeWitt. This all changed when, under the Young/Perlman management, a massive yard improvement problem was initiated. Selkirk was selected to become what it is today, or at least was under PC/CR, one of the most important yards on the system. Rebuilt and modernized, it completely replaced DeWitt, which today no longer exists. There were two reasons for this, one of which is for certain: there was much more room at Selkirk for expansion than at DeWitt. The other, which is an educated guess is this: one of the first yards built under Perlman was Frontier Yard at Buffalo, replacing a complex of several old yards, the largest of which was Gardenville. If trains were to be reclassified at a modern complex in Buffalo, the DeWitt was too close to reclassify them again, so Selkirk was in the right place geographically. Selkirk as you know it today, never operated as a NYC yard; it was not completed until after the PC merge.

New York's plans for an effective passenger rail system remain in the planning phase, while other states have added the passenger train to their approaches to transportation.


These states have worked with Amtrak during the past several years to develop improved rail service as part of their respective economic development agendas. While New York championed similar efforts 30 years ago, we now have the dubious distinction of being the only state to be at odds and, in fact, in court with Amtrak, over the failed joint high-speed rail development deal of 1998.

Perhaps we need to talk about the wider significance of improved rail service in New York and its effect on traffic and trade in the Northeast.

Rail travel across upstate New York consists of Amtrak's "Empire Corridor" trains playing cat and mouse with a daily parade of CSX freight trains. CSX's Chicago-bound route is among the nation's busiest freight corridors, funneling valuable freight traffic to metropolitan New York City, New Jersey and New England. The status of the CSX route as a major component of the transportation network for the Northeast means that it is a national transportation asset for freight traffic now and potentially passenger rail traffic in the future.

The line was at one time a mode separated railroad with freight and passenger trains on separate tracks to allow for the faster running passenger trains such as the legendary "Twentieth Century Limited." The passenger-only tracks were removed around the time the state Thruway was opened for business and passenger trains and freight trains have shared the same tracks ever since. Current congestion on this busy railroad means that in order for the route to serve as an effective passenger line, the dedicated passenger tracks will have to be put back. Fortunately, the right of way remains available for this option.

Pennsylvania has just completed a $150 million corridor development project to connect its capital (Harrisburg) to its major metropolitan area, Philadelphia. Maximum train speeds were notched ahead to 110 mph, knocking off 15 minutes for new express trains on the 104-mile line. Pennsylvania has an economic advantage over New York as their new railroad represents an environmentally responsible transportation asset to foster smart growth and attract business and jobs.

The Pennsylvania deal was conceived of after our own 1998 high speed plan for connecting Albany and New York City. Amtrak has contracts with 14 states, worth an estimated $147 million, for similar projects in other parts of the country.

Unfortunately, since 1998, New Yorkers have experienced stagnation, punctuated by increasing fares and declining reliability on the Empire Corridor. One so-called "improvement" for New York thus far has been the discontinuation of food service on the Albany- New York City trains in 2005. This has forced passengers to grab their morning coffee before they board their trains, though some of that coffee reportedly is better than the Amtrak brew.

To further our efforts to actually achieve something along the lines of the Pennsylvania example, New York formed a High Speed Rail Task Force last year to tell us what will be required to get some snappy new trains to connect our cities. The Task Force headed up by transportation expert John Egan correctly advises the need for far greater public investment in rail, utilizing state-federal cost-sharing formulas to address both deferred maintenance (20 percent state, 80 percent federal) and future improvements (50/50). As a comparison, federal highway projects today enjoy a much more favorable "match point" of only 10 percent state funds and 90 percent federal funds. The environmentally friendly and fuel efficient mode -- rail -- is being penalized.

Similarly, the state Department of Transportation has just released its corridor based vision for transportation for the year 2030. That report also cites the need to create a seamless system in which travelers can conveniently shift between modes and operators to complete trips that meet their individual and business needs. The report also notes that the transportation system is essential to economic competitiveness and that we risk falling behind other states with more dynamic transportation plans.

Political players in Washington and Albany often talk of the need to develop energy and environmental policies that are sensitive to our wounded planet. Strategic rail projects, like the Empire Corridor, offer the opportunity to address these desires and further economic development in New York and the Northeast. Let's hope the new team in Albany can articulate the need to develop the rail system in New York and explain the importance of its role as a transportation asset for the entire Northeast. They will need to work with the realigned Congress to press for rail project parity with federal highway projects.

This is probably our best shot in years for bringing responsible projects forward that address our collective desire for sustainable transportation policies. While we seem to have the plans and desire to develop a rail service option for New York, it will ultimately be the match point that wins the game.

Ben Gottfried is the Susquehanna region coordinator for the Empire State Passengers Association, a rail passengers advocacy group and published this article in the Albany Times Union.
AC Delco Albany

Buried Treasure in Albany



The Albany County Clerk has a New Archive of Albany Photos of the 1930s & ‘40s. Right now, there is a brief show online, but eventually they will have 2,300 images online. Until they establish a system of granting permission to use the images, you can use this link. The photos will be searchable by keyword. They are hoping to link with a vendor who can provide archival quality photographs at a modest charge.

No, the picture at left is not one of them. I got it when I was consulting for AC Delco.

Click here or on picture above to see.
Timeline of Railroads in the Adirondacks
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RAILEX

The trains are a joint operaton of Union Pacific Railroad and CSX Transportation. While much of the produce has moved from west to east, Railex actively seeks products from the East Coast to send back on the trains.

The appeal of this mode of transport: Each train can replace 200 or more trucks, and reduces consumption of diesel fuel by 100,000 gallons or more, Railex says.

Railex began operating its first train in October 2006.

RAILEX MOVES FOOD!


The food distributor has begun operating two round trips a week between Wallula, Washington and its warehouse in Rotterdam Industrial Park, plus another two round trips a week between Delano, Calif., and Rotterdam.

The company at last count had nearly 200 employees.

Port of Albany



It's called the Ethanol Express, and every few days it delivers another 45,000 barrels of the high-octane fuel produced from Midwest corn crops to the Port of Albany.
Cibro Petroleum expanded its storage space at the port to double in demand for ethanol.



A project to ship fresh produce by train nonstop from the Pacific Northwest to Albany is expected to create 200 jobs here. CSX Transportation and Union Pacific Railroad are working together with AMPCO Distribution Services to launch the service in early 2006. One train a week -- with 55 refrigerated boxcars -- would travel from a loading point in Wallula, Wash., near Richland, to a refrigerated warehouse and distribution center to be built along CSX tracks in Albany County.

From that warehouse, produce will be shipped throughout the northeastern United States and eastern Canada. The nearly mile-long train will carry the equivalent of 200 tractor-trailer loads of produce. Albany County was chosen as the end point because of its proximity to the Northway and the Thruway, allowing quick access by trucks from the distribution center to Boston, New York City, Montreal and other Northeast population centers.

The train would carry apples, pears and potatoes grown in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Shipments eventually could include produce from California and items imported from Asia.

Rail cars with enhanced insulation and energy-efficient cooling systems would be used, according to CSX, and shipments would be tracked using global-positioning system monitors. One challenge will be finding cargo to ship back to the West Coast.

There might be opportunities to ship items from the Port of Albany or from local producers. The port is experiencing a surge in containerized cargo, and expects to handle as many as 6,000 containers this year. Having an empty freight train heading back to the West Coast might provide other opportunities for shippers using the port.

Ethanol's growing popularity has been a boon for the Port of Albany

Ethanol's growing popularity has been a boon for Cibro Petroleum at the Port of Albany, N.Y., which will add up to a half-dozen workers to handle demand, according to the Albany Times-Union. The company has seen the volume handled nearly double in the past month as major oil companies substitute the fuel for methyl tertiary-butyl ether to help gasoline burn more cleanly.

Cibro unloads ethanol from CSX trains that bring the fuel from the Midwest and on to barges that take it to refineries and fuel terminals in the Northeast for blending with gasoline.

The company last week unloaded 142 rail cars, or a little more than 4 million gallons of ethanol, which then was stored in tanks at Cibro or transferred to barges.
Selkirk Branch
Yahoo! Group: SelkirkBranch · CSXT's Selkirk & Mohawk Subdivisions

The Hudson River

The Adirondacks The Hudson River begins in the Adirondacks region of New York State.
The Delaware & Hudson had a route to North Creek and an extension to Tahawus.
Glens Falls Glens Falls is located in Warren County and is known as the "Gateway to the Adirondacks" because of its unique location bordering the Adirondack Park. Glens Falls and the Adirondack Region are world-renowned vacation destinations with an estimated 7.6 million annual visitors. Glens Falls
Mechanicville Boston & Maine Railroad crossed the Hudson River here.
Waterford The Albany main of the Delaware & Hudson railroad enters Waterford from Cohoes and a mile above the village joins the Green Island branch enters the southern part of the village within three hundred feet of the Hudson and partially runs through streets. From Waterford Junction the road extends northerly through the town. Barge Canal
Federal Lock Also known as "Lock 1", the Federal Lock is the northern limit of ocean-going craft and the beginning of the canal. Barge Canal
Green Island Bridge Don't have a picture of the Green Island bridge yet,
but this fuel tank was right on the river nearby.
King Fuels on Hudson River
Livingston Avenue Bridge The New York Central Railroad
built this bridge to carry freight trains over the Hudson.
Passenger trains came across to the station on the Maiden Lane Bridge.
This bridge is gone and Amtrak uses the Livingston Avenue bridge now.
Livingston Avenue Bridge
Albany The capital of New York State.
The first NY State railroad (Mohawk & Hudson) started here.
Nearby West Albany was once the site of New York Central's largest shops. The Erastus Corning Tower stands 589 feet high, the tallest building in New York State outside New York City.
Albany
Castleton Bridge (Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge)
Castleton Bridge (Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge)
Poughkeepsie Bridge
See a full story on the Poughkeepsie bridge
Poughkeepsie Bridge after fire
Newburgh-Beacon (was ferry) NY Waterway
Croton-Harmon Harmon was a New York Central-created community and came into existence because it was a logical point to be the outer limit of the electric zone. Harmon
Tarrytown Tarrytown had a ferry at one time and now has the Tappan Zee highway bridge.
The sailboat is my grandfather, who was New York Central Paymaster.
Ken Knapp on Hudson River
New York City Pennsylvania Railroad Tunnels
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Penn Central New Haven Railroad New York Central Railroad
Interested in Penn Central? New York Central? Pennsylvania Railroad? New Haven Railroad? or in the smaller Eastern US railroads? Then you will be interested in "What if the Penn Central Merger Did Not Happen". You will also enjoy "Could George Alpert have saved the New Haven?" as well as "What if the New Haven never merged with Penn Central?"

Rumors, Rumors, Rumors

Heard a rumor (February, 2006)on a Yahoo! railroad group that CSX is going to try and sell Selkirk Yard to a non-class 1 RR. CSX is having more than its share of labor problems there plus paired with poor service would make this a wise choice if it were to be true. The only non- class 1 RR in the area is Guilford, which has strong ties with CP & NS and would be a major boom to their business ALSO if this were to come true. Never say never!

Hasn't this rumor been going around since about 2000?

Doesn't have to be someone directly in area. Two efficient companies that could run it would be Genesee & Wyoming Industries or Providence & Worcester.

Ok , I will play along... What would CSX use for major yard for North East?

CP Rail has a direct route from the D&H yard at Kenwood via the Albany Secondary. Depends on what CSX does about the tracks leading into Selkirk from the East, West and South.

Its called "outsourcing". Industry does it all the time. CSX is looking for a neutral party to run the yard. They are really saying: "hauling freight is our primary business, not switching it". Just like shortlines, somebody else can operate the yard cheaper than CSX. Would operate similar to Belt Railway of Chicago. Operator selected needs some financial strength, good management structure, and railroad experience. Doesn't necessarily mean they must currently operate a major switching facility; good operations types can be recruited from other belt and terminal lines such as Indiana Harbor Belt; Elgin, Joliet & Eastern; and the BRC. (These three roads would make excellent operators, but their ownerships cloud the neutrality issue.)



There's another good one that we haven't heard in awhile: That UP is coming to take over/merge CSX. Still waiting....

Any other good ones out there?
The Hudson Line south of Beacon

The Hudson Line south of Beacon.



Austin McEntee collection

The Hudson Line is no longer a four track main. AMTRAK and Metro North make do with two tracks. At left is Bannerman’s castle on Polopel Island. At one time the castle housed a collection of war relics and surplus ammunition. The City of Newburgh is along the river bank in the distance. Dutchess Junction and Beacon are out of view around the bend to the right.

See more about the New York Central in Beacon
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Required Attire for a Remote Workforce



Ever wonder how your telecommuting colleagues really live? Turns out, many of them actually do work in their pajamas. They also tend to love their work-life balance – to the point where they’d take a pay cut to maintain the status quo. This is a “must read” for both remote workers and for their office-bound managers.
Selkirk Branch

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West Shore Railroad

Sharing the “Water Level Route” with the New York Central was the West Shore; first as a competitor; later a subsidiary.

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